Math & Science

The Department of Math & Science provides CCQ students with knowledge of mathematical skills and scientific critical thinking. The Department offers different courses in Math & Science. Some of these courses are noncredit-level courses in Math and other courses are credit-level courses in Math, Biology, Chemistry and Physics for all students. Currently we offer first & second year level courses in Math & Science to all CCQ students with plans for modifications in some of our courses to align our students' needs.

Course Name Course # Description SLO – Student Learning Outcome
Math Foundation for ArtsMath0388

Course content provides a mathematics foundation for arts and business students. Topics include fundamental operations in whole numbers, fractions and decimals, percent, ratios, proportions, descriptive statistics, introduction to the real numbers, solving linear and literal equations, and graphing linear equations. (This course is not for graduation credit.)

 

 

1. Perform all four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) with whole numbers.

2. Perform factorizations of whole numbers and recognize prime numbers.

3. Rename and reduce fractions.

4. Perform all four operations with fractions.

5. Perform all four operations with decimal numbers.

6. Perform conversions among decimals, fractions, and percents.

7. Convert written expressions into ratios.

8. Perform conversions involving ratios.

9. Perform operations necessary to solve proportions.

10. Find perimeter and area of selected geometric figures.

11. Develop a basic understanding of descriptive statistics and pictographs.

12. Interpret data from tables, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs.

13. Perform all four operations involving signed numbers, including following proper order of operation.

14. Perform operations necessary to solve algebraic equations in one unknown.

15. Perform operations necessary to solve literal equations for a specified variable.

16. Graph linear equations in two variables in the rectangular coordinate system.

17. Calculate the intercepts and slopes of a line both graphically and algebraically.

18. Find the equation of a line that contains two given points.

Math Foundation for scienceMath 0399

This course is designed to develop student's basic mathematical skills. It offers student's instruction and practice in the basic arithmetic operations of real numbers, graphing linear equations, exponents and polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radical expressions and equations. The student who successfully completes this course should be ready for College Algebra for science (Math 1314).

 

  1. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide real numbers, fractions and decimals.
  2. Solve literal equations and linear equations.
  3. Solve percent problems and applications.
  4.   Solve and graph linear equations in two variables and linear inequalities.
  5. Calculate the slope of a line; find the equation of a line in point slope form, slope intercept form.
  6. Simplify expressions through the use of exponent rules.
  7. Manipulate scientific notation expressions.
  8. Add, subtract, multiply and divide polynomial expressions.
  9. Factor polynomial expressions using the techniques of the greatest common factor, difference of two squares, special trinomials, grouping, and the AC method.
  10. Solve quadratic equations through factoring.
  11. Add, subtract, multiply, divide and simplify rational expressions, including complex fractions with applications.
  12. Simplify Roots, radicals, and graph radical functions.
  13.  Multiply and divide complex numbers.
  14. Solve the quadratic equation using the square root property, the quadratic formula and completing the square.
College Algebra MathMath1314Topics include quadratics, polynomial, rational, logarithmic and exponential functions, system of equations, matrices and determinants.
  1. Formulate algebraic and/or transcendental equations using variables to represent relations.
  2. Apply mathematics skills to solve application problems.
  3. Construct, manipulate, and utilize mathematical functions.
  4. Solve algebraic equations and inequalities involving linear and nonlinear expressions.
  5.  Examine and interpret the graphs of circles, polynomial functions, rational functions, basic functions, and their transformations.
  6. Apply the basic knowledge of a function in order to simplify functions, combine functions, and solve application problems involving linear and nonlinear functions.
  7. Perform basic matrix operations.
Statistics MathMath1342This course is designed to serve as a study in courses requiring knowledge of statistics. Principles of both descriptive and inferential statistics are discussed, illustrated, and applied in situations close to most of students' experience.
  1. Understand the nature of statistics.
  2. Collect and display data.
  3. Analyze data.
  4. Understand basic probability concepts.
  5. Construct confidence intervals.
  6. Perform hypothesis testing.
  7. Perform regression analysis.
College Math for Arts Math 1313

Course content provides a general knowledge of mathematics for art Students. Topics include: sets, graphs, systems of linear equations, basic geometry, metric system, Probability, consumer mathematics.

 

1. Be able to perform the basic set operations.

2. a- Be able to solve linear equations in one variable.

b- Be able to solve problems with one variable.

c- Be able to solve linear inequalities in one variable

d- Be able to graph linear equations in 2 variables.

e- Be able to graph linear inequalities

f- Be able to solve quadratic equations using factoring and quadratic formula.

g- Be able to understand graphs of functions.

3. Be able to solve systems of linear equations substitution, elimination and graphs.

4. a- Be able to understand the units used for the length, the area and the volume.

b- Be able to understand the units used for mass and temperature

c- Be able to do conversions between units.

5. a- Learn the basic terms in geometry.

b- Recognize polygons and some of their properties.

c- Be able to calculate the perimeter, the area, the volume and the surface area of some polygons.

6. a- Be able to solve percent problems.

b- Be able to solve financial applications involving simple, and compound interest.

7. a-    Be able to use the basic counting techniques.

  1. Be able to draw tree diagrams.
  2.  Be able to use the multiplication principle of counting.
  3. Understand permutations and combinations.
  4. Understand conditional probability.
  5. Be able to find expected values.
Finite Math with ApplicationsMath1324This course focus on application to problems of business and the natural and social sciences. Topics include set theory, probability, introduction to matrices, system of equations, linear programming,
introduction to statistics and mathematics of finance.
This course is intended for students majoring in liberal arts and secondary education.
  1.  Solve business / financial problems by the use of systems of equations, systems of inequalities, and 
        matrices.
  2.  Formulate and solve linear programming problems using geometric and simplex method.
  3.  Analyze information and make conclusions based on set data.
  4.  Comprehend, analyze, and synthesize statistical data in order to make predictions.
  5.  Compute probabilities using principles of sets and counting.
  6.  Solve financial applications involving simple compound interest and annuities.
Pre-Calculus MathMath2412

Topics include elementary theory of functions and equations, analytic geometry,

vectors, introductory logic, mathematical induction, sequences and finite series

  1. Represent and manipulate algebraic and trigonometric functions and relations algebraically, graphically, and numerically, including partial fraction decomposition and finding zeroes of functions.
  2. Engage in algebraic and trigonometric problem solving and modeling.
  3. Synthesize algebraic and trigonometric facts and laws into proofs.
  4. Analyze and manipulate equations between various two dimensional systems such as rectangular, polar, vector representations, conic systems and axes manipulations, as well as solving equations in these systems.
  5. E.  Investigate and perform summations and predictions on geometric, algebraic and binomial sequences and series 
Calculus-1 MathMath2413

This course focuses on:

Limits of functions, the notions of continuity and differentiability to algebraic and trigonometric functions, concepts of derivative, properties of functions, implicit differentiation to solve related rates problems, detailed graphs of nontrivial functions using differentiation,  basic integration, simple differential equations, the connection between area and the definite integral, fundamental Theorem of Calculus to evaluate definite integrals,  differentiation and integration to solve real world problems.

 

  1. Evaluate limits of functions.
  2.  Analyze and apply the notions of continuity and differentiability to algebraic and trigonometric functions.
  3. Use the concepts of derivative and the various formulas associated with it to investigate properties of functions.
  4. Use implicit differentiation to solve related rates problems.
  5. Construct detailed graphs of nontrivial functions using differentiation.
  6. Use basic integration techniques to solve simple differential equations.
  7. Demonstrate the connection between area and the definite integral.
  8. Apply the fundamental Theorem of Calculus to evaluate definite integrals.
  9. Use differentiation and integration to solve real world problems.
Calculus-2 MathMath2414

This course focus on:

introduction of trigonometric inverse functions and their properties,  hyperbolic functions and their inverses, evaluate integrals using different integration techniques, improper integrals and methods for their evaluation, sequences and use it to develop the study of properties of infinite series,  infinite series and develop skills to determine their convergence,  introduction to  power series and expansion of functions in Taylor series and Maclaurin series,  polar coordinate system and find the tangent lines and arc length for parametric and polar curves and area in polar coordinates

 

  1. To introduce trigonometric inverse functions and their properties.
  2. To introduce Hyperbolic functions and their inverses.
  3. To develop skills to evaluate integrals using different integration techniques.
  4. To introduce improper integrals and methods for their evaluation.
  5. To introduce sequences and use it to develop the study of properties of infinite series.
  6. To introduce infinite series and develop skills to determine their convergence.
  7. To introduce power series and expansion of functions in Taylor series and Maclaurin series.
  8. To introduce polar coordinate system and find the tangent lines and arc length for parametric and polar curves.
  9. To find area in polar coordinates
Biology-1BIOL1306The course focus on biological chemistry, biological processes, cellular morphology, metabolism, genetics and molecular biology

1. The student will be able to recognize the basic structure and describe the function of eukaryotic cellular organelles and cell systems.

2. Given a DNA or RNA base sequence, the student will be able to deduce:

  • the sequence of the complementary DNA strand
  • the sequence of the complementary messenger RNA strand
  • complementary codons and/or anticodons
  • the proper amino acid sequence in a peptide by using a supplied table of genetic code.

    3. The student will be able to explain the synthesis and properties of
  • carbohydrates
  • lipids
  • proteins
  • nucleic acids

    4. The student will be able to devise an experiment containing the proper experimental test points along with proper positive and negative controls.

    5. The student will exhibit competence with bringing the brightfield microscope into focus.

    6. The student will develop the habit of reliable attendance by being absent from class no more than four times per semester.

    7. The student will demonstrate punctuality in the submission of class assignments on their due date.
Lab Biology-1BIOL1106

Laboratory related to biological chemistry, biological processes, cellular morphology, metabolism, genetics and molecular biology. The course focuses on the principles of biology, including biological chemistry, cellular morphology, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and biotechnology. 

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the basic concepts of General biology-I in a laboratory environment.

1. Explain prokaryotic, animal, and plant structure and function at the level of molecules and cells, to include biological macromolecules, cellular organization, communication, cell division and gametogenesis, energy transformations, and the metabolic reactions associated with cellular activities, such as the processes of glycolysis, fermentation, cellular respiration, and photosynthesis, at the survey level.
2. Understand basic knowledge of Mendelian genetics, perform and interpretation of genetics problems, and of advances in the understanding of genes and chromosomes since Mendel.
3. Explain the molecular sequence of events involved in the flow and expression of genetic information in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, with special emphasis on the understanding of DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis, at the survey level.
4. Understand how technology has affected the development of science and how scientific knowledge can be applied to various aspects of life, community, the environment, and the important social and ethical issues related to biology and medicine. Apply basic knowledge of the methodologies and applications in biotechnology, and be aware of biotechnological career paths in the biological sciences.

General Biology -2-

 

BIOL 1307

Introduction to biodiversity and principles of classification of living organisms, microscopic/micro-organisms (bacteria and protozoa), algae and fungi, plants and animals, the biological interactions between living organisms & the beneficial relations (like symbiosis up to the most harmful one such as parasitism).

 

 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the system of classification.
  2.  Classify organisms at least to the class and order level.
  3. Recognize affinities between different phyla.
  4. Predict the best ecological factors for living organisms.
  5.  Define key biological interactions between different organisms.
  6.  Identify some selected examples of Qatari Flora and Fauna to the species level.
General Biology  Lab -2-BIOL 1107

Biodiversity and principles of classification of living organisms, microscopic/micro-organisms (bacteria and protozoa), algae and fungi, plants and animals, the biological interactions between living organisms & the beneficial relations (like symbiosis up to the most harmful one such as parasitism).

 

 

 

  1. Explain prokaryotic, animal, and plant structure and function at the level of molecules and cells, to include biological macromolecules, cellular organization, communication, cell division and gametogenesis, energy transformations, and the metabolic reactions associated with cellular activities, such as the processes of glycolysis, fermentation, cellular respiration, and photosynthesis, at the survey level.
    2. Understand basic knowledge of Mendelian genetics, perform and interpretation of genetics problems, and of advances in the understanding of genes and chromosomes since Mendel.
    3. Explain the molecular sequence of events involved in the flow and expression of genetic information in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, with special emphasis on the understanding of DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis, at the survey level.
    4. Understand how technology has affected the development of science and how scientific knowledge can be applied to various aspects of life, community, the environment, and the important social and ethical issues related to biology and medicine. Apply basic knowledge of the methodologies and applications in biotechnology, and be aware of biotechnological career paths in the biological sciences.
NutritionBIOL1322Biochemistry, physiology and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals; nutrient digestion, absorption and transport; nutrient requirements and deficiencies; dietary surveillance; life stage nutrition; evaluation of nutritional claims.   

The student will obtain a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of nutrition.  Upon completion of this course, the student will be prepared to continue related course work in the nutritional/health sciences.

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the macro- and micronutrients, nutrient requirements and deficiencies, nutrient metabolism, appropriate nutrition for different life stages.
  2. 2-Apply nutritional knowledge to his/her  own life in order to analyze personal dietary intakes and to evaluate food labels and validity of nutritional product claims.
Anatomy & Physiology (1)BIOL2401The objective of this course is to give students going into health sciences a basic knowledge of Human Anatomy & Physiology. Topics include anatomical terminology, tissues, and four out of eleven systems (Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular and Nervous) that make up human body
  1. Students will be able to understand and apply the principals of homeostasis and the importance of feedback loops.
  2.  Students will be able to evaluate information and make conclusions based on their knowledge of membrane transport.
  3. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of muscle structure to explain how muscles function.
  4. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of the structure of the skeletal system to its functions.
  5. Students will be able to understand and apply their knowledge of changes in polarity on membrane potential.
  6. Students will be able to apply and demonstrate their knowledge concerning reflex arcs.
  7. Students will be able to apply the knowledge gained in lab utilizing anatomical models, physiological experiments, histological slides and the compound light microscope.
  8. Students will utilize online interactive evaluation tools to gauge their understanding of key anatomical and physiological concepts prior to lecture/examinations/quizzes where applicable.
Anatomy & Physiology (2)BIOL2402

The course gives basic knowledge of Human Anatomy & Physiology. Topics include Endocrine system, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, Blood, Digestive system, Urinary system and reproductive system

 

  1. Outline histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system; explain hormone receptor interactions that provide foundation for understanding the basis of many pharmacological agents that are developed for treatment of various maladies of the human body.
  2. Learn the histology, gross anatomy, physiology and the terminologies of the cardiovascular system and describe the normal values for blood volume, differential white blood cell counts, blood pressure, cardiac cycle, electrocardiogram and the pulse rate.
  3. Study the histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the respiratory and urinary systems, discuss the structural and physiological linkage of these systems with the cardiovascular system and define terminologies and normal values of the respiratory system.
  4. Describe histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the immune system, explain components and functions of non-specific and specific immunity, the various mechanisms that human body has to protect itself against harmful agents and pathogens, and discuss the different types of malfunctions in the immune system.
  5.  Describe histology, gross anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal and reproductive systems of the human body; understand the cellular physiology of the processes involved with digestion and reproduction.
Medical TerminologyMDCA1313This course is designed for students interested in the medical and paramedical fields. The emphasis is on the use of medical word parts, pronunciation, spelling, and the definitions of key pathology, diagnostic, and treatment procedures terms with a brief overview of the structure and functions of the body system.
  1. Learn the meaning of Greek and Latin word parts and the rules for connecting them to form medical terms.
  2. Be able to use prefixes, word roots, combining forms and suffixes to build medical words.
  3. Recognize certain body systems according to anatomical terms, word parts and medical terms.
  4. Analyze, define pronounce and spell medical words correctly.
  5.  Use the medical dictionary to look up medical terms.
Chemstry-1CHEM1311Science and engineering majors study atomic structure, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, electronic configuration, chemical bonding, molecular structure, gases, states of matter, and properties of solutions.
  1. Give names and formulas of elements, ions, and ionic and molecular compounds.
  2. Categorize, complete, and balance chemical reactions.
  3.  Do chemistry calculations involving reaction stoichiometry and energy  changes.
  4. Relate the properties of electromagnetic radiation (frequency, wavelength, and energy) to each other and to the energy changes atoms undergo which accompany electronic transitions.
  5. Identify the parts of the periodic table and the trends in periodic properties of atoms.
  6. Relate the properties of gases with the gas laws and extend the application of these relationships to reaction stoichiometry, gas mixtures, and effusion/diffusion of gases.
  7.  Depict chemical bonding with dot structures and valence bond theory and determine the molecular shapes (geometry) of molecules based on VSEPR and valence bond theory.
Lab Chemistry-1CHEM1111Science and engineering majors study atomic structure, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, electronic configuration, chemical bonding, molecular structure, gases, states of matter, and properties of solutions.
  1. Give names and formulas of elements, ions, and ionic and molecular
         compounds.
  2. Categorize, complete, and balance chemical reactions.
  3. Do chemistry calculations involving reaction stoichiometry and energy changes.
  4. Identify the parts of the periodic table and the trends in periodic properties of atoms.
  5. Relate the properties of gases with the gas laws and extend the application of these relationships to reaction stoichiometry.
General Chemistry-2-Chem 1312

This general level course offers an in- depth understanding of principles of general chemistry and their application in life, health and industry with emphasis on fundamental analytical approach based on general chemistry principles. Closed form and numerical solutions techniques to thermodynamic problems are included.

Core Curriculum Course. CHEM 1312 can be used toward associate degree natural science requirements.

 

 

  1. Understand liquid and solid states of matter, intermolecular forces, crystal structure of solids, unit cells, hydrogen bonding, vapor pressure, boiling and freezing points and phase diagrams.
  2. Describe solution properties, concentration units, solubility, and colligative properties.
  3. Understand the chemical equilibrium concept and the use of the equilibrium constant, give the relation between Kp and Kc, describe factors affecting equilibrium constants, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, acid-base equilibria. Define pH and pH indicators. Perform calculations of the pH strong and weak acid and base solutions, and titration. Describe solubility equilibria and the solubility product, complex formation.
  4. First, second and third law of thermodynamics, entropy, Gibbs (free) energy, and the relation between G and the equilibrium constant.
  5. Describe and balance redox reactions, galvanic and electrolytic cells, oxidizing and reducing agents. Calculate the electromotive force of a cell, apply the Nernst equation, and describe applications including dry batteries.
  6. Define the reaction rate, rate constant, and order of a chemical reaction, explain the collision theory, the effect of temperature on the reaction rate, catalysis.
  7. Draw structures and give the systematic names of hydrocarbons, identify and name the major functional groups. Describe the structure of some major bio-organic molecules and industrially important polymers
General Chemistry Lab-2-Chem 1112First of all, the students will be learning about lab safety practices. The labs of this course covers experiments over General Chemistry II concepts and topics. The course introduces students to experiments over the topics in thermochemistry and calorimetry, UV/VIS spectroscopy and spectrophotometry, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, acidity basicity pH measurements and titration. Students will also be learning how to write a scientific report and the use excel to report data and results in a table and graph format.  Scientific report should include a pre-lab, introduction, data and graphs, results and discussion including sources of error and a post lab.
  1. Recognize chemical safety and hazardous materials icons, and apply laboratory safety rules.
  2. Describe the laboratory instruments, data acquisition methods and measurement techniques used in the general chemistry laboratory
  3. Prepare standard solutions and use accurate volumetric and mass-based techniques for chemical analysis.
  4. Describe and use UV/VIS spectrophotometric methods of analysis.
  5. Prepare accurate laboratory reports of their experimental results.
  6. Use their knowledge of general chemistry and its applications for further study within the framework of chemistry.
Ecology 1Ecol 1350

This course covers the basic introduction to ecology. Lecture focuses on the study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Classes covers climatic variation and aquatic environments. Major concepts related to the structure, function, organization and regulation, at various levels (population, community, ecosystems and biomes), are covered via theory, laboratory work and field trips.

The purpose of the laboratory and field component of this course is to reinforce the concepts covered in the theory component. In the laboratory and on field trips, students perform experiments and practice analytical and quantitative skills by performing statistical analyses of collected ecological data and applying ecological models. They will also design, execute and present ecological experiments, which test hypotheses pertaining to fundamental ecological principles, including those underlying environmental problems.

  1. To explain the scientific process in environmental science, biogeochemical cycles, progressive and stationary waves, biological habitats, food chain, coastal dynamics and pollution.
  2. To describe factors that impacts the marine environment.
  3. To propose reasonable environmental scenarios resulting from the effects of multiple stressors and their cascading effects on the marine biota.
  4. Through the lab, students will be able to demonstrate practical proficiency in the lab techniques, evaluation and interpretation of the results obtained.
  5. To demonstrate critical thinking in discussing a case study related to the management of the coastal zone.
  6. To show evidence of clarity and rigor in essays, laboratory reports and group discussions.
  7. To demonstrate an understanding of the causes and consequences for the marine environment of emerging issues such as climate change, contamination, harmful blooms, ocean acidification.
  8. To understand the marine measuring tool, how it is measured and the benefit these tools.
Ecology Lab-1-BIOL 1150

This course covers the basic introduction to ecology. Lecture focuses on the study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Classes cover climatic variation and aquatic environments. Major concepts related to the structure, function, organization and regulation, at various levels (population, community, ecosystems and biomes), are covered via theory, laboratory work and field trips.

The purpose of the laboratory and field component of this course is to reinforce the concepts covered in the theory component. In the laboratory and on field trips, students perform experiments and practice analytical and quantitative skills by performing statistical analyses of collected ecological data and applying ecological models. They will also design, execute and present ecological experiments, which test hypotheses training to fundamental ecological principles, including those underlying environmental problems.

1. To explain the scientific process in environmental science, biogeochemical cycles, progressive and stationary waves, biological habitats, food chain, coastal dynamics and pollution.

2. To describe factors that impacts the marine environment.

3. To propose reasonable environmental scenarios resulting from the effects of multiple stressors and their cascading effects on the marine biota.

4. Through the lab, students will be able to demonstrate practical proficiency in the lab techniques, evaluation and interpretation of the results obtained.

5. To demonstrate critical thinking in discussing a case study related to the management of the coastal zone.

6. To show evidence of clarity and rigor in essays, laboratory reports and group discussions.

7. To demonstrate an understanding of the causes and consequences for the marine environment of emerging issues such as climate change, contamination, harmful blooms, ocean acidification.

8. To understand the marine measuring tool, how it is measured and the benefit these tools.

General Environment (1)ENVR1301It is a study of the world's Ecosystem, Energy, Pollution and Environmental Policy, emphasizing the Ethics and Environmental Inter-relationships, Ecological Principles, Biodiversity, and Human Population issues. It also examines the importance of Fossil fuels, Nuclear and renewable energy sources. Examine soils and Agricultural methods, Land use and Water management.

Upon completion of this course, student should acquire the knowledge in the field of Environmental Science that he or she can organize, analyze and learn to apply within the field of their choice. The instruction strives to provide:

  1. A transferable science core elective to cross discipline major
  2. Scientific instruction to a culturally diverse student body
  3. Information to strengthen the problem-solving abilities to those who are deficient in Science and Mathematics
  4. The tools necessary to interpret environmental conditions/phenomena that may affect the student in his or her future.

NOTE - Classroom discussion, take-home assignments, written examination, quizzes, articles, and verbal presentations will measure the student's achievements as part of the successful completion of the course.

Physics-1PHYS1301

The course is introducing mechanics, momentum, circular motion, mechanical waves.  

Also, it presents basic elementary of classical introduction to temperature, heat and thermodynamics and strengthens the understanding of the concepts through a broad range of interesting applications to real world.

 

  1. Describe The SI unit system and convert units.
  2. Describe Translational motion: position and inertial frames, inertia, velocity, acceleration, linear momentum and force.
  3. Introduce Rotational motion: angle, angular velocity, angular acceleration, angular momentum, moment of inertia, and torque.
  4.  Identify Newton's three laws of motion and solving problems on one and two dimensional translational motion.
  5. Represent graphically the problem of motion of a physical system using the free-body diagram technique.
  6. Identify  Forces acting on ordinary mechanical systems (Drag force, frictional force, normal force, etc.).
  7. Introduce Laws of kinematics and dynamics of rotational motion of a rigid and solving problems on simple rotational motion.
  8. Describe Translational and rotational motion conservative and non-conservative forces.
  9.  Introduce Concept of center of mass, law of conservation of mechanical energy, Principle of momentum and angular momentum conservation.
  10. Introduce Conditions of static and dynamic Equilibrium of a point particle and a rigid body, and solving problems of static equilibrium.
  11. Identify Elastic Properties of materials: Rigidity ; Plasticity ; Plastic deformation ; stress and strain ; Bulk stress and strain ; Bulk deformation and bulk modulus; Linear tensile stress and strain ; Young's modulus; Shearing.
  12. Introduce Static of Fluid: density & pressure, and fluid at motion using the continuity equation and Bernoulli's equation.
  13. Describe Parameters of Oscillatory and Wave Motion: amplitude, period, frequency, angular frequency, speed, energy transported,  power and intensity of a wave.
  14. Describe Simple Harmonic Motion qualitatively and quantitatively and its applications.
  15. Introduce Principle of superposition, interference, diffraction, reflection, transmission, refraction, standing waves and Resonance.
  16. Identify Temperature, specific and molar heats of capacity.
  17. Introduce State zeros and first laws of thermodynamics.
  18. Introduce Heat energy transfers and its simple applications.
Lab Physics-1PHYS1101

● The course is introducing applications and experiments of mechanics, momentum, circular motion, mechanical waves.

●The course present applications of basic introduction to temperature, heat and thermodynamics.

  1. Applications of SI unit system and convert units.
  2. Applications of Newton's three laws of motion.
  3. Applications of motion of free-Falling Objects.
  4. Applications of laws of kinematics and dynamics of rotational motion of a rigid body.
  5. Applications of Translational and Rotational motions.
  6. Applications of mechanical energy & momentum.
  7. Applications of static and dynamic equilibrium of a point particle
  8. Applications of elastic properties of materials.
  9. Applications of static fluid in terms of density and pressure.
  10. Applications of oscillatory and wave motion: amplitude, period, frequency, angular frequency, speed of a wave, energy transported, power and intensity.
  11. Applications of wave characteristics and simple harmonic motion: standing waves and Resonance.
  12. Applications of temperature, specific and molar heats of capacity.
  13.  Applications of theory of heat energy transfers.
Physics-2PHYS1402

This course focus on:

The Electric Field, Gauss' Law, Electrical Potential, Capacitance & Dielectric, Current and Resistance, Circuits and Kirchhoff's Rules, Magnetic Field and Magnetic Force, Current and Magnetic Flux, Magnetic Field for Different Objects, The Hall Effect, Faraday's Law, Lenz's Law, Ampere's Law, Self-Induction, RL Circuits, Transformers, Properties of E-M Waves.

 Introduction to Light & Optics:  Light's properties, Applications, Polarization of Light.

  1. State the fundamental laws and theorems of electricity & magnetism in their integral and differential forms, namely: Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Lorentz law, Biot-Savart law, Ampere's circuital theorem, Faraday's law, Lenz's law, and Maxwell's equations.
  2. Define and determine electric force, field, potential, capacitance, and energy due to simple, static charge distribution.
  3. Define and determine magnetic field, potential, and energy due to simple, steady current distribution.
  4. Represent the electric field graphically and draw the equipotential lines of electric potential for various static, simple charge configurations.
  5. Represent the magnetic field graphically for various, simple, steady current configuration.
  6. Describe and explain the effects due to the electric and magnetic properties of materials.
  7. Determine electric field, emf, and induced current due to varying magnetic field in a circuit of given dimensions and resistance.
  8. Define and calculate self and mutual inductance and energy stored in an inductor.
  9. Analyze simple DC and AC circuits.
  10. Use the laws of reflection, refraction and total internal reflection of light to determine angles and images.
  11. Determine interference, diffraction and polarization characteristics using the relevant formulas.
Lab Physics -2-Phys 1102

This course is the second of two general physics laboratory courses. It treats the subjects of electricity & magnetism covered in course PHYS 1302 lectures. This laboratory course gives an introduction to the methods employed in experimental physics. This involves data taking, data analysis, error analysis, and scientific reporting of the results. Several different experiments will be conducted. Each week a different experiment will be performed during the Lab session.

 

1.  Test experimentally some of the physical laws and theories taught in lecture room.

2.  Fit observed data with mathematically modeled physical phenomenon.

3.  Use a variety of electrical measuring instruments and tools, e.g. AC/DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, Ammeter, Multimeter, CRO, Resistor, Transformer, Coil, and Capacitor and utilize them to construct simple AC and DC circuits.

4.  Estimate the uncertainty by applying the rules of Standard Deviation in the case of repeated measurements of a single quantity and by employing the technique of Least-Squares Fitting in the case of experiment that involves the measurement of several values of two or more different quantities.

5.  Apply the technique of error propagation to estimate and manipulate the uncertainty in directly and indirectly measurement of physical quantities

6.  Evaluate some uncertainty related quantities, namely accuracy and precision, confidence level, discrepancy, and significance of a discrepancy, and utilize them to determine the sources of experimental errors, and to discuss how to minimize the uncertainties in the funded results.

7.  Incorporate computer in measuring and analyzing the experimental result.

8.  Communicate scientific results in a written manner through presenting a word-processed report on the conducted experiment.

9.  Check experimentally the phenomenon of increasing of the capacitance of a capacitor when a dielectric fills the space between its plates.

10. Verify Ohm's law experimentally for different resistors setting, and use it to measure the resistivity, and conductivity of aluminum and copper.

11. Test experimentally the relation between the electrical current near the melting point of a conducting wire and its diameter.

12. Practice the exponential behavior of charging –discharging of a capacitor in an RC circuit and measure the long and short time constant of the circuit.

13. Check experimentally the linear temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of a conducting material and the exponential temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of a semiconducting material, and use the results to identify the structure of the material.

14. Measure the strength of the local Magnetic Field of the Earth using the Biot-Savart law at the center of a coil.

15. Verify experimentally the expected geometrical behavior of electron moving in electric and magnetic fields, and use the data to estimate the electron charge to mass ratio.

16. Inspect the electrical properties of AC transformer and measure its efficiency.

17. Analyze the resonance phenomenon that occurs in the AC series LRC circuit.

18. Verify the laws of diffraction and the principle of superposition using Laser beam.

Geology 1

GEOL 1301

 

This course designed for science and non-science majors needing an A- category core Natural Science course. Fundamental of physical geology is covered. Geology 1301 is an introductory course in geology, and discusses earth materials and physical processes that are crucial to the formation of planet Earth. It introduces materials critical to further study in the Geologic sciences, and important and supportive of further studies in the earth and Natural Science

1. Describe how the scientific methods has led to our current understanding of Earth's structure and processes

2. Interpret the origin and distribution of minerals, rocks and geological resources

3. Describe the theory of plate tectonics tectonic and its relationship to the formation and distribution of earth's crustal futures.

4. Quantify the rates of physical and chemical processes acting on Earth and how these processes fit into the context of geologic time.

5. Communicate how surface processes are driven by interactions among Earth's systems ( eg. The geosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere).

6. Identify and describe the internal structure and dynamic of Earth

7. Describe the interaction of humans with Earth (e.g., resources, development or hazard assessment).

8. Evaluate typical laboratory materials pertinent to physical geology ad write laboratory reports in a style appropriate to the field 

9. Classify rocks and mineral based on chemical composition physical properties, and origin,

10. Apply knowledge of topographic maps to quantify geometrical aspects of topography

Geology Lab 1GEOL 1101

This laboratory compliments of Geology I (GEOL1301) course.  It includes identification of minerals and rocks, interpretation of topographic maps and geologic folios, landforms and rock structures.  Field trips may be taken

 

1. Demonstrate the use of scientific measurements and the metric system of units.

2. Diagram the Geologic Time Scale and reproduce its chronological sequence with approximate dates for the Eras, Periods and Epochs.

3. Identify and describe the readily observable properties of minerals, and use these properties to identify common minerals with the aid of a flowchart.

4. Identify by name, and their properties, common igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.

5. Use a USGS topographic map to determine elevations, distances, and positional information (using the Government Land Survey System also known as Township and Range) of specified locations.

General Astronomy-1ASTR1303

Course content provides a foundation for Astronomy and Galaxies around universe. To study motion in the sky, study of gravity, light, radiation, optics, observation and constellation of stars and galaxies

 

  1. Exploring the sky
  2. Cycles of the Moon
  3. The origin of Modern Astronomy
  4. Gravity
  5. Light and telescope
  6. Stars
  7. Atom and Spectra
  8. The Sun
  9. The family of stars
  10.  The Interstellar Medium
  11.  The formation and structure of stars
  12. Stellar evolution
  13. The Death of Stars
  14.  Neutrons stars and black wholes
  15. The milky way Galaxy
  16. Galaxies
  17. Active Galaxies and supermassive black holes
  18. Modern Cosmology
  19. Astrobiology
Introduction to EngineeringENGR1201

Introduction to engineering as a discipline and profession

The material taught in this course will provide an understanding for prospective students intending to major

in engineering of the skills and requirements necessary toward obtaining a degree in Engineering.

  1. Demonstrate and understanding of the meaning of Engineering as a profession and a discipline.
  2. Develop organizational and learning skills required to succeed in College/University.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the ethical responsibility issues of the Engineering profession.
  4. Demonstrate basic mathematical and computer skills required for pre‐engineering students.

Math & Science

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